- Southeast Arizona Birding Guide, Richard Fray - https://arizonabirder.com -

Flame-colored Tanager

After yesterday’s exertions, day seven of the tour started a little later, with a stroll in Ramsey Canyon, followed by a visit to St. David, ending at the superb Westward Look Resort in Tucson.

Ramsey Canyon:

The female FLAME-COLORED TANAGER was on her nest, but barely visible. After a while, the stunning male appeared in a nearby tree, carrying food, and posed for a while before feeding his mate and disappearing.

Flame-colored Tanager [1]

Also in the canyon, WHITE-THROATED SWIFT, MAGNIFICENT and BROAD-TAILED HUMMINGBIRDS, three calling ELEGANT TROGONS (all of which remained hidden), ARIZONA WOODPECKER, DUSKY-CAPPED and SULPHUR-BELLIED FLYCATCHERS, PLUMBEOUS and HUTTON’S VIREOS, HERMIT THRUSH, AMERICAN ROBIN, GRACE’S WARBLER, a pair of PAINTED REDSTARTS with a nest under a clump of grass by the side of the trail, RUFOUS-CROWNED SPARROW, YELLOW-EYED JUNCO, HEPATIC TANAGER, and BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK.

Red Rock Skimmer [2]

Ramsey Canyon [3]

Ramsey Canyon [4]

We saw yet another GREATER PEWEE. They seem to be doing particularly well this year.

Greater Pewee [5]

Holy Trinity Monastery, St. David:

Our main target bird was MISSISSIPPI KITE, and we had good views as one flew overhead. Such graceful birds.

Mississippi Kite [6]

Also there, ‘MEXICAN’ MALLARD, GRAY and ZONE-TAILED HAWKS, COMMON GROUND-DOVE, GREATER ROADRUNNER, BROWN-CRESTED FLYCATCHER, a pair of TROPICAL KINGBIRDS, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, excellent views of a close YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT, SUMMER and WESTERN TANAGERS, and a pair of BULLOCK’S ORIOLES with a carefully-concealed nest.

'Mexican' Mallard (Mexican Duck) [7]

'Mexican' Mallard (Mexican Duck) [8]

Tropical Kingbird [9]

Holy Trinity Monastery, St. David [10]

Westward Look Resort, Tucson:

The usual range of classic desert species were found in the beautiful habitat on the grounds, and ANNA’S, COSTA’S and BROAD-BILLED HUMMINGBIRDS were coming to the many flowers that make this resort special.

As with last summer, there were a bunch of MONARCH butterflies also visiting the flowers. While I do usually see one or two of this migrant species in SE Arizona each year, usually in fall, this summer occurrence is most odd. Last year I surmised they must have been left over from a wedding party that released captive-bred butterflies as part of the ceremony. This year, maybe the same, or maybe they have formed a non-migratory population. Either way, it was an unusual, but rather neat sight.